186_Blue_Carbon_06

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/the-stuff-of-life/?source=homepage

186_Haasts_Eagle_09

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/annihilation/?source=homepage

186_eDNA_01

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/a-kind-of-magic/?source=homepage

186_Chickens_09

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/ba-gerk/?source=homepage

_20A2860

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/ba-gerk/?source=homepage

Society

Meet the doctors preparing for our worst-case scenario

Medical care across New Zealand works on the following principle: get to the nearest hospital as fast as possible. But what if storms, flooding, landslides or earthquakes make that impossible? One emergency doctor is determined to equip medical students for our increasingly unpredictable future.

Magazine

ISSUE 186

Mar - Apr 2024

Blue carbon

Chickens

Cyclone recovery

HoneyComb hill

e-DNA

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Society

Hawke’s Bay had no emergency plan for a big flood

And it didn’t need to. No regional council is required to make detailed emergency plans for natural disasters. The vast majority of Hawke’s Bay residents, however, live in on a flood plain and what happened on the night of February 13-14, 2023, was a test case in unpreparedness.

Profile

Eating up

To help her people thrive, health scientist Amy Maslen-Miller first wants to give them a seat at the table.

Archive

Living World

The life and times of Shag 224796

Kawau tikitiki, spotted shags, are a little bit special. In the Hauraki Gulf, they’re genetically unique and highly endangered. Auckland Museum senior researcher Matt Rayner has spent the last few years trying to figure out how to stop them disappearing entirely.

Science & Environment

The stuff of life

There are places in our seas where the great, whirring cogs of the world hold still. Where the process of decay pauses—for your lifetime, for your children’s, longer—and carbon sleeps, tucked safely away in the sludge. In New Zealand these places are the fiords, the ocean deeps, and the spongy, muddy fringes of our coastlines. And we’re only just beginning to understand them.

History

Annihilation

Fifty years ago, the government was burning swathes of native forest, using napalm as an accelerant. But under one particular forest was a hill, and under that hill was a system of caves filled with the bones of the dead: moa, giant eagles, tiny songbirds. If the forest went, the fossils would go, too.

Living World

Ba-gerk!

Driven partly by egg prices but also, surely, by the sheer joy of keeping chickens, Gallus gallus domesticus is really having a moment.

Science & Environment

A kind of magic

Bacterium or blue whale, every living thing leaves a trace. Now we have a tool that can find that trace, in soil, in water—even in the air—and it’s changing the way we do science.

Geography

After Gabrielle, volunteers are salvaging homes and lives

Twelve months on from Cyclone Gabrielle, many people are still fighting to return home. On February 14, 2023, floodwaters filled their houses with mud and destroyed possessions, memories, and livelihoods. Survivors were left virtually on their own to tackle the massive clean-up job—until a network of volunteers began digging out houses and supporting them through the trauma, forging unexpected connections along the way.

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