Science and environment

Critter of the Week – Chatham Islands’ stag beetle

Swept by Southern Ocean storms and isolated for 1.75 million years, the Chatham Islands are a treasure trove of flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world. This week's critter is the Chatham Islands' stag beetle. There are only two species of stag beetle surviving on the Chathams and both are endangered, living in fragmented habitats and vulnerable to predation.

Critter of the Week – Chatham Islands’ stag beetle
0:00 / 12:40
Science and environment

Kaikōura paua fishing back, five years post quake

Five years after the earthquake which devastated the Kaikōura coastline, people are once again be able to gather pāua from its shores. The fishery has reopened for three-months much to the joy of local people who have been missing the chewy delicacy. Samantha Gee was in Kaikōura for opening day.

Kaikōura paua fishing back, five years post quake
0:00 / 3:21
Science and environment

Study looks into where Wellington would shake most

The depth of the sedimentary basin beneath Wellington is the reason there was so much shaking and damage in parts of Wellington during the 2016 Kaikoura Earthquake. That's the finding of  a new study by Tim Stern, a professor of geophysics and tectonics at Victoria University and master's student, Alistair Stronach. Stern spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Study looks into where Wellington would shake most
0:00 / 4:12
Science and environment

Kōkako nest survey underway in Auckland’s Hunua Ranges

The annual kōkako nest survey is underway deep in Auckland's Hunua Ranges. Years of hard work mean the kōkako population is booming, with more than a hundred breeding pairs. But how do you keep an eye on just how many chicks are hatching each year? Our reporter Sarah Robson went out to the Hunua Ranges to see how it's done.

Kōkako nest survey underway in Auckland’s Hunua Ranges
0:00 / 4:15
Science and environment

Aotearoa’s wild weather

Few conversations in Aotearoa pass without some reference to the weather. Is the rain coming in? Is the wind direction changing? Can the barbeque go ahead? Meteorologist and Head of Weather Communications at Metservice, Lisa Murray talks about the weather for a living. But she and her colleagues also carry a heavy responsibility when it comes to predicting severe weather events in time to save lives and livelihoods. Lisa is one of the authors of a new book put out by Metservice, which looks at the history and science behind our worst weather, called New Zealand's Wild Weather.

Aotearoa’s wild weather
0:00 / 29:49
Science and environment

Marine heatwave affecting NZ

New Zealand is literally in hot water - coastal sea temperatures around Aotearoa are well above what's normal. That's according to NIWA, which has reported "marine heatwave" conditions in all regions. So is it time to hit the beach? NIWA meteorologist Ben Noll spoke to Corin Dann.

Marine heatwave affecting NZ
0:00 / 2:54
Science and environment

An AUT student documentary about discovering you have a rare eye condition

Troubled by intensifying problems with his eyesight, Jacob Scott was diagnosed with the rare eye condition known autosomal dominant optic atrophy. In this documentary, he explores its impact on himself and his family.

An AUT student documentary about discovering you have a rare eye condition
0:00 / 10:00
Science and environment

Our Changing World – The Southern Alps Long Skinny Array

The Alpine Fault is the on-land boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates that runs almost the length of the South Island. Claire Concannon catches up with a team from Te Herenga Waka – Victoria University of Wellington as they install a seismic sensor on the fault line near Whataroa on the West Coast. This is one in a set of more than 50 sensors that will be placed 10km apart along the length of the fault as part of the Southern Alps Long Skinny Array project, known as SALSA. The aim is to record and decipher the ambient seismic noise – the background hum of the fault line – which in turn will enable them to create virtual earthquakes that can mimic what ground shaking will look like when a slip happens anywhere along the fault. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bU_O6Qe6Knk&ab_channel=OutThereLearning[/embed] The SALSA project is funded by the Marsden Fund of the Royal Society Te Apārangi and involves scientists and graduate students from Victoria University of Wellington—Te Herenga Waka, SeismoCity Ltd., GNS Science, the University of Auckland, and the universities of Edinburgh, Tokyo and Washington. The project is led by Professor John Townend of Victoria University of Wellington and Dr Caroline Holden of SeismoCity Ltd. The project uses equipment and gets technical and logistical expertise from the Portable Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL) Instrument Center in Socorro, New Mexico. The SALSA team very gratefully acknowledges the support and encouragement of Te Rūnaka o Makaawhio and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, the Department of Conservation, Fox and Franz Heliservices, Aratuna Freighters, Out There Learning, and landowners throughout the region. Kia ora mai tātou. Ngā mihi nui ki a tātou.

Our Changing World – The Southern Alps Long Skinny Array
0:00 / 12:38
Science and environment

Why we all have a different scent!

You stink, but don't take it personally. Every human being has a distinct smell that says a lot about your diet, your health, even your emotions. Journalist Jude Stewart says access to many memories, and even information about our health, is right under our nose. She puts one of our least appreciated senses front and center in her book "Revelations in Air: A Guidebook to Smell."

Why we all have a different scent!
0:00 / 20:21
Science and environment

In the Company of Gardeners

Photographer Juliet Nicholas and writer Sue Allison have produced a collection of New Zealand's most magnificent gardens, and met the inspired gardeners behind them. In the Company of Gardener has enough botanical detail to appeal to the most experienced of gardeners, while its stunning photography will also inspire newcomers to don gardening gloves. Kathryn speaks with Juliet Nicholas, an acclaimed garden photographer, and Sue Allison an award-winning journalist and author.

In the Company of Gardeners
0:00 / 16:24
Science and environment

Thousands of mussels to be dropped into Auckland bay

Twenty-thousand tonnes of mussels are booked to be dropped into Ōkahu Bay as part of an ambitious Ngāti Whātua Ōrakei plan to replenish seabeds that have over the past century been severely depleted. It's the third such massive drop to have taken place as part of the effort to, as it were, re-mussel 500 square kilometres. Revive Our Gulf project restoration coordinator - or kairuruku whakahaumanu kaimoana - Peter van Kampen spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Thousands of mussels to be dropped into Auckland bay
0:00 / 4:02

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