Living World

Ohiwa – The food basket of many hands

East of Whakatane, in a sparsely populated segment of the Bay of Plenty, lies one of the country's smaller and less well-known harbours: Ohiwa. Shallow and dotted with islands, its warm waters have long been a major food resource for local iwi. For even longer, migratory birds have fattened themselves up here for their annual flight back to the northern hemisphere. Asin many coastal settlements, locals worry about the impact of development and tourism on their way of life, but for now Cammy Savage can still fill her kete with cockles, and the harbour lives up to its reputation as"te raweketia a teringaringa," the food basket of many hands.

Magazine

057

ISSUE 057

May - Jun 2002

Adélie penguins

Ohiwa Harbour

Renewable energy

Korean war

Subscribe

Archive

Science & Environment

Reaping the wind

Like huge mechanical locusts, turbines at the Tararua Wind Farm harvest the breezes that funnel through the hills near Palmerston North. Is this the look of the future for our landscape? With diminishing gas reserves, fluctuating hydro lake levels and mounting pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, interest in alternative energy source is growing. A "sunset clause" in New Zealand's electricity-supply legislation and the high cost of getting power to remote homes make DIY generation worth a serious look.

Living World

Adèlie – the walking bird

A mantle of snow shows the tracks of travelling Adèlie penguins heading towards their colonies for the summer breeding season. Only at this time of year do these hardy birds come ashore. The rest of their lives is lived out among the pack ice that surrounds Antarctica.

History

Kiwis in Korea: When the Cold War ran hot

In June 1950, communist North Korea invaded the South. The newly fledged United Nations immediately came to South Korea's aid, mustering a multinational army in which New Zealand was swift to enlist. In what was the first escalation of the Cold War into open conflict, 6100 Kiwis served on sea and land. But who remembers them today?

Thanks, you're good to go!

Thanks, you're good to go!

{{ contentNotIncluded('company') }} has not subscribed to {{ contentNotIncluded('contentType') }}.

Ask your librarian to subscribe to this service next year. Alternatively, use a home network and buy a digital subscription—just $1/week...

Go back

×

Subscribe to our free newsletter for news and prizes