Science & Environment

Jellyfish

Drifting at any depth in all the world’s oceans, these creatures range from an Arctic species with a bell the size of a car, to a venomous microscopic Australian. Carnivorous predators, jellyfish swarm around our coasts and litter our beaches, yet we know surprisingly little about them. Some of the most recognisable species don’t even qualify as true jellyfish. One such, a Portuguese Man of War (Physalia physalis), its inflated bladder keeping it poised at the surface, is not even a single animal, but a sizeable colony containing four types of minute, highly modified polyps.

Magazine

102

ISSUE 102

Mar - Apr 2010

Tasman Solo

Wild pines

Jellyfish

Farming

Circus

Chew Chong

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Science & Environment

Wilding Pines

Pinus contorta, a native conifer of North America, was deliberately seeded through swathes of high country and conservation estate as a counter-measure to erosion. These rugged self-seeding trees and other stray exotics now infest hundreds of thousands of hectares throughout the country.

Living World

The Merchant of Taranaki

In a climate of fanatical anti-Chinese sentiment, Chew Chong saved the bacon of Taranaki pioneer farmers, contributed significantly to New Zealand’s dairy industry, and was acknowledged for it in his lifetime.

Science & Environment

Twilight of Idyll

Modern agriculture’s rhythms are urgent, its scale corporate. Driving across the Canterbury plains today there are futuristic grain research stations, slick billboards promoting yield-boosting technologies, and the now-ubiquitous centre-pivot irrigators that extend 500 metres like pylons brought to earth.

Geography

Solo

Waves surrendered their foaming crests to the sky, sheared off and carried in the wind to hammer against the hull of the small boat like nails tossed from a speeding car. The crackling surface seethed and thrashed at the gunwales, licked the scuppers, and water lobbed into the cockpit.

Living World

Circus; A world of upside down, of big stacked on small

Circus is a kind of magic, arrived at by blood, sweat and tears. You sense the magic the moment you step off Christchurch’s noisy Moorhouse Avenue and into the hall that houses CircoArts, a two year diploma programme at the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology that prepares its students for a career under the Big Top.

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