Tectonic forces are pushing land up in some places, and down in others, meaning that the effects of sea-level rise will be lesser in some areas, but greater in others.
 
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May 9, 2022
 
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The sea is rising, but the land is moving, too

Sea-level rise is usually presented in graphs like the one above, which shows the average readings of Wellington Harbour tidal gauges over the last century.

But in New Zealand, the land is moving, too. Tectonic forces are pushing land up in some places, and down in others, meaning that the effects of sea-level rise will be lesser in some areas—but that sea-level rise may happen twice as fast as expected along some coasts.

A massive project to map both sea-level rise and land movement around the entirety of New Zealand's coastlines now reveals how much those coastlines are set to change. What have we built that's now at risk? Keep reading...

 
 
 
 
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What storms may come

Much of New Zealand’s coastal property has an expiry date, with its value set to be wiped off the ledger in as little as nine years’ time, well before sea levels rise and coastlines are redrawn. What will happen to marae and communities by the beach? And why are we still buying—and building—properties right in the danger zone? Keep reading...

 
 
 
 
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This past summer was a scorcher, not just on land but in the sea, too. In some of New Zealand’s coastal waters, temperatures reached four degrees higher than normal, while in the Bay of Plenty, a marine heatwave began in November and continued into March. Keep reading...